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Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

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Workman Publishing Company #ad - Looking back with fascination, horror, at times unbelievable, Quackery recounts the lively, knowing humor, and not a little dash of dark, history of medical misfires and malpractices. When liquefied gold was touted as immortality in a glass. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, trial and error, here are dozens of outlandish, morbidly hilarious “treatments”—conceived by doctors and scientists, they literally tried to sell snake oil—that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen yes, and straight-up scams.

With vintage illustrations, and advertisements throughout, photographs, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine. What won’t we try in our quest for perfect health, beauty, and the fountain of youth? Well, just imagine a time when doctors prescribed morphine for crying infants.

Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything #ad - And when strychnine—yes, that strychnine, the one used in rat poison—was dosed like Viagra.  .

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The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth: And Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine

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Dutton #ad - Beyond a series of anecdotes, these painfully amusing stories reveal a great deal about the evolution of modern medicine. Award-winning medical historian Thomas Morris delivers one of the most remarkable, cringe-inducing collections of stories ever assembled. A puzzling series of dental explosions beginning in the nineteenth century is just one of many strange tales that have long lain undiscovered in the pages of old medical journals.

Some show the medical profession hopeless in the face of ailments that today would be quickly banished by modern drugs; but others are heartening tales of recovery against the odds, patients saved from death by the devotion or ingenuity of a conscientious doctor. However embarrassing the ailment or ludicrous the treatment, every case in The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth tells us something about the knowledge and ignorance of an earlier age, along with the sheer resilience of human life.

The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth: And Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine #ad - Delightfully horrifying. Popular scienceone of mental floss's best books of 2018one of science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018This wryly humorous collection of stories about bizarre medical treatments and cases offers a unique portrait of a bygone era in all its jaw-dropping weirdness. Witness mysterious illnesses such as the rhode island woman who peed through her nose, unfortunate Predicaments such as that of the boy who honked like a goose after inhaling a bird's larynx, Tall Tales like the "amphibious infant" of Chicago, Horrifying Operations 1781: A French soldier in India operates on his own bladder stone, a baby that could apparently swim underwater for half an hour, and a plethora of other marvels.

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The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine

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Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who, were lauded for their speed and brute strength. She introduces us to lister’s contemporaries—some of them brilliant, the dead houses where they studied, some outright criminal—and leads us through the grimy schools and squalid hospitals where they learned their art, and the cemeteries they ransacked for cadavers.

Eerie and illuminating, the butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world. These pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high.

The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine #ad - Wilson prize for literary science writingshort-listed for the 2018 wellcome book prizea top 10 science book of fall 2017, bestselling author of Dead Wake In The Butchering Art, The Guardian "Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, Publishers WeeklyA Best History Book of 2017, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery and shows how it was transformed by advances made in germ theory and antiseptics between 1860 and 1875.

. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the riddle and change the course of history. Fitzharris dramatically reconstructs Lister’s career path to his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection and could be countered by a sterilizing agent applied to wounds.

Winner, 2018 PEN/E. O.

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Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - A witty, to polio—and a celebration of the heroes who fought themIn 1518, irreverent tour of history's worst plagues—from the Antonine Plague, in a small town in Alsace, to leprosy, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn’t stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon thirty-four more villagers joined her.

Then more. Get well soon delivers the gruesome, morbid details of some of the worst plagues we’ve suffered as a species, as well as stories of the heroic figures who selflessly fought to ease the suffering of their fellow man. And in turn-of-the-century new york, an Irish cook caused two lethal outbreaks of typhoid fever, a case that transformed her into the notorious Typhoid Mary.

Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them #ad - Throughout time, humans have been terrified and fascinated by the diseases history and circumstance have dropped on them. In late-seventeenth-century england an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome—a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis for which there was then no cure.

Some of their responses to those outbreaks are almost too strange to believe in hindsight. In a month more than 400 people had been stricken by the mysterious dancing plague. With her signature mix of in-depth research and storytelling, and not a little dark humor, Jennifer Wright explores history’s most gripping and deadly outbreaks, and ultimately looks at the surprising ways they’ve shaped history and humanity for almost as long as anyone can remember.

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The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul

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St. Martin's Press #ad - To avoid poison, they depended on tasters, unicorn horns, and antidotes tested on condemned prisoners. For centuries, royal families have feared the gut-roiling, vomit-inducing agony of a little something added to their food or wine by an enemy. Men rubbed turds on their bald spots. One of washington independent review of books' 50 Favorite Books of 2018 • A Buzzfeed Best Book of 2018"Morbidly witty.

Marilyn stasio, the new york Times "You’ll be as appalled at times as you are entertained. Bustle, one of the 17 best nonfiction Books Coming Out In June 2018"A heady mix of erudite history and delicious gossip. Aja raden, "what your favorite authors are reading this summer, author of StonedIn the Washington Post roundup, " A.

The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul #ad - J. Ironically, medications, royals terrified of poison were unknowingly poisoning themselves daily with their cosmetics, and filthy living conditions. Women wore makeup made with mercury and lead. Servants licked the royal family’s spoons, tried on their underpants and tested their chamber pots. In the royal art of poison, and, festering natural illness, ever-present excrement, Eleanor Herman combines her unique access to royal archives with cutting-edge forensic discoveries to tell the true story of Europe’s glittering palaces: one of medical bafflement, sometimes, poisonous cosmetics, murder.

Physicians prescribed mercury enemas, arsenic skin cream, and potions of human fat and skull, drinks of lead filings, fresh from the executioner.

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Bad Days in History: A Gleefully Grim Chronicle of Misfortune, Mayhem, and Misery for Every Day of the Year

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National Geographic #ad - From caligula's blood-soaked end to hotelier steve wynn's unfortunate run-in with a priceless picasso, these 365 tales of misery include lost fortunes like the would-be Apple investor who pulled out in 1977 and missed out on a $30 billion-dollar windfall, romance gone wrong like the 16th-century Shah who experimented with an early form of Viagra with empire-changing results, and truly bizarre moments like the Great Molasses Flood of 1919.

Think you’re having a bad day? Trust us, it gets worse. National geographic and author Michael Farquhar uncover an instance of bad luck, epic misfortune, and unadulterated mayhem tied to every day of the year.

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Royalty's Strangest Characters: Extraordinary But True Tales of 2000 years of mad monarchs and raving rulers

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Batsford #ad - From the madness of ancient rome, exemplified by the emperor caligula who wanted to appoint his horse to the consulate, we go on to meet Charles VI of France, never separated from her late husbands coffin, Queen Juana of Spain, convinced he was made of glass, and King Otto of Bavaria, who tried to ward off hereditary insanity by shooting a peasant a day.

. From kleptomania and incest to transvestism and even pigeon fancying, all these and many more colourful characters can be found in this revealing trawl of the worlds royal families. Recounting over 2, this unique look at the worlds craziest kings and queens will leave you shocked, 000 years of daft despots, raving rulers and potty potentates, amazed and often in fits of laughter.

Royalty's Strangest Characters: Extraordinary But True Tales of 2000 years of mad monarchs and raving rulers #ad - Throughout history, royalty and scandal have gone hand-in-hand like a prince of Wales and his mistress witness the pocket-picking Farouk I of Egypt, only one of whom was legitimate, more recently, who fathered an estimated 355 children, Augustus II of Poland, and, Britains master of tact and diplomacy, Prince Philip.

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Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine

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Avery #ad - He wore pink silk suits to perform surgery, added an umlaut to his last name just because he could, and amassed an immense collection of medical oddities that would later form the basis of Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum. Award-winning writer cristin o’keefe aptowicz vividly chronicles how Mütter’s efforts helped establish Philadelphia as a global mecca for medical innovation—despite intense resistance from his numerous rivals.

This was the world of medicine when Thomas Dent Mütter began his trailblazing career as a plastic surgeon in Philadelphia during the middle of the nineteenth century. Although he died at just forty-eight, and a compassion-based vision for helping the severely deformed, Mütter was an audacious medical innovator who pioneered the use of ether as anesthesia, the sterilization of surgical tools, which clashed spectacularly with the sentiments of his time.

Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine #ad - Brilliant, and brazenly handsome, outspoken, Mütter was flamboyant in every aspect of his life. A mesmerizing biography of the brilliant and eccentric medical innovator who revolutionized American surgery and founded the country’s most famous museum of medical oddities Imagine undergoing an operation without anesthesia performed by a surgeon who refuses to sterilize his tools—or even wash his hands.

Foremost among them: Charles D. Mütter’s marvels interweaves an eye-opening portrait of nineteenth-century medicine with the riveting biography of a man once described as the "P. Barnum of the surgery room. ".

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Because I Said So!: The Truth Behind the Myths, Tales, and Warnings Every Generation Passes Down to Its Kids

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Scribner #ad - Yes, all those years you were told not to sit too close to the television or swallow your gum or crack your knuckles are called into question by our country’s leading trivia guru. Armed with medical case histories, and even the occasional experiment on himself or his kids, scientific findings, Jennings exposes countless examples of parental wisdom run amok.

Whether you’re a parent plagued by needless concern or a kid of any age looking to say, “I told you so, ” this is the anti– helicopter parenting book you’ve been waiting for. Jennings separates myth from fact to debunk a wide variety of parental edicts: no swimming after meals, don’t talk to strangers, sit up straight, and so on.

Because I Said So!: The Truth Behind the Myths, Tales, and Warnings Every Generation Passes Down to Its Kids #ad - Author of planet funny ken jennings “reveals the truth behind all those things you tell your children” Parade in this entertaining and useful New York Times bestseller “armed with case histories, scientific finds, and experiments on himself and his own children” Los Angeles Times. Is any of it true? if so, how true? Ken Jennings wants to find out if parents always know best.

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Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - A lady doesn't question. Unmentionable is your hilarious, illustrated, and featuring nearly 200 images from victorian publications, jane eyre, scarlet o'hara, and all of our great, laugh-out-loud funny, scandalously honest yet never crass guide to the secrets of Victorian womanhood, UNMENTIONABLE will inspire a whole new level of respect for Elizabeth Bennett, giving you detailed advice on: ~ What to wear ~ Where to relieve yourself ~ How to conceal your loathsome addiction to menstruating ~ What to expect on your wedding night ~ How to be the perfect Victorian wife ~ Why masturbating will kill you ~ And moreIrresistibly charming, great grandmothers.

Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners #ad - And it just might leave you feeling ecstatically grateful to live in an age of pants, anti-depressants, epidurals, super absorbency tampons, and not-dying-of-the-syphilis-your-husband-brought-home. New york times bestsellerhave you ever wished you could live in an earlier, where there's arsenic in your face cream, more romantic era? Ladies, welcome to the 19th century, a pot of cold pee sits under your bed, and all of your underwear is crotchless.

Why? shush, dear.

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Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad, and Criminal in 19th-Century New York

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Algonquin Books #ad - Today we call it Roosevelt Island. In damnation island, stacy horn shows us how far we’ve come in caring for the least fortunate among us—and reminds us how much work still remains. Then, two prisons, an almshouse, it was Blackwell’s, site of a lunatic asylum, and a number of hospitals. A riveting character-driven dive into 19th-century New York and the extraordinary history of Blackwell’s Island.

Laurie gwen shapiro, author of the stowaway: a young man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica On a two-mile stretch of land in New York’s East River, a 19th-century horror story was unfolding. Digging through city records, newspaper articles, and archival reports, Horn brings this forgotten history alive: there was terrible overcrowding; prisoners were enlisted to care for the insane; punishment was harsh and unfair; and treatment was nonexistent.

Throughout the book, we return to the extraordinary reverend william Glenney French as he ministers to Blackwell’s residents, testifies at salacious trials, battles the bureaucratic mazes of the Department of Correction and a corrupt City Hall, and in his diary wonders about man’s inhumanity to man.

Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad, and Criminal in 19th-Century New York #ad - Conceived as the most modern, in the words of a visiting Charles Dickens, humane incarceration facility the world ever seen, Blackwell’s Island quickly became, “a lounging, listless madhouse. In the first contemporary investigative account of blackwell’s, reformers, and journalists, Stacy Horn tells this chilling narrative through the gripping voices of the island’s inhabitants,  as well as the period’s officials, including the celebrated Nellie Bly.

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